How Star Wars Handles Diversity Now (Opinion)

The new Star Wars are dripping with politics. We got the token black guy, token Asian, token female protagonist and token feminist, two of which are written as stereotypes. In this article I'm going to talk about three of them. Please note that these are my opinions, and don't reflect the opinions of Dewback Discussion's team as a whole.

Finn is the black janitor, filling the role as servant to help the others along, while they show him how it's done. This started with Poe, then Rey, then Rose. In the Force Awakens we see him being put in a position that we can identify with: realizing he is on the wrong side. While he decides to do something about it, Poe needs his help to get away. Once they have crashed into the planet, and he has to bring BB-8 to the rebels, he needs to be saved by Rey and then help her when she gets involved. At this point in time it's not a big issue yet. He has some development that can go in a lot of directions. 
But the Last Jedi amplifies the stereotype, using him first as some comic relief (which miserably fails to deliver) when he walks around in a leaking bacta-suit, then as some slow, or ignorant, guy who has to be told how things are.
So we see him wanting to flee ship, in order to prevent Rey from homing back into the disaster that's unfolding. This is setting him up for saving her, but he fails because he is caught by Rose. Then they think of a plan that can possibly save the rebellion, and he has to get Rose to Canto Bight, where they have to find some mastercoder. There she has to tell him how these richest of the rich acquired their wealth, and that he has to look closer to the creatures to see they're not treated well. She has to take charge of their mission, and then they get into trouble for his parking mistake.
In jail, they have to get rescued by a scoundrel who clearly has a grasp on the situation. But instead of following him in the first place, they take it upon themselves to go on a sidequest, to rescue all the slave creatures, which is very likely to get them into trouble again. Of course when that happens, they have to be saved again by DJ. Then, after he is a little slow to catch up to the fact that DJ stole the ship, they have DJ tell him that arms dealers make money off both sides, again explaining the way the world works to him.
Fast forward to the battle on Crait; everyone around him magically know how the Mono-ski Speeders work, he is the one having trouble figuring them out, and he needs to be told how they work after almost crashing. 

Lucasfilm

Lucasfilm

Compare him to Lando, the black guy in the original trilogy.
Lando was introduced as a character that had his own life. He ran Cloud City, he and Han went way back, and Han wasn't even sure how Lando would respond to them showing up.
As it turned out, Lando had made a deal with Vader, to basically get a free pass for his business, if Lando helped turn in some guy (he never met) who  was a friend to Han. Then Vader tortures Han, and puts him in carbonite, and Lando realizes he's in over his head, and he shifts his allegiance. He shows his responsibility for the people he leads and tells them to escape. This is the end of Cloud City; the business he made the deal for in the first place.
After he joins the rebellion, he leads the charge to destroy the Death Star, and is ultimately successful in doing so. This is a great black character who elevates the story.
You can argue that Finn is just a bad character who just happens to be black, but he was cast because he was black while Billy D. Williams was cast for his charisma.

Holdo is the token feminist, so stuck in her anti-male mindset that she endangers the entire rebellion. Firstly; Admiral Ackbar is killed off just so she can replace him; we have not seen her earn her place. Then when she takes charge she immediately trashes Poe, obviously not respecting him in any way. 
In the deleted scenes, Luke (previously the male hero) tells Rey that the rebellion needs heroes who take action. That scene might not have made the movie, but it's in the novel and therefor still canon. Holdo not only contradicts this philosophy; she prevents someone wanting to take action to do so.
Poe is a respected commander in the fleet, because he is a great pilot and gets things done. But because he is a hot-shot trigger-happy guy, she basically castrates him from his potential. She doesn't explain anything to him about her plan, because he would endanger that plan, and by doing so she ironically compromises the plan herself by giving him no other option than to start a mutiny. Trust has to go both ways, there is an abundance of stories that teach us this. But in this case the feminist puts the  blame on a man for not trusting her, when she didn't trust him in the first place.
It is terrible storytelling, and doesn't do justice to the ideologies they try to force down our throat. 

Lucasfilm

Lucasfilm

Rose is the token Asian. She just lost her sister. She's an engineer of sorts, doing god knows what, preventing people from running away because her sister died for the cause and everyone who runs away is a traitor to her sister and the rebellion.
Then one of her heroes turns up, is about to flee ship, and after she stuns his ass they think of some plan to stop the First Order from tracking them through hyperspace. So far, so good.
But while Poe is much more qualified to do this job, she goes instead, without having anything special to contribute. She is forced into this story, like the SJW's try to force equality on everything; regardless of qualifications.
Then they go to some planet to get the help of a guy that has the power to save them, but while they're there they have to take a quick detour to free some slave creatures (that in all probability will be caught again anyway) while their friends are dying. 
Fast forward to Crait after their own mission was a gigantic failure; Finn is going to try the last thing possible to save everyone else, and she stops him. She actually endangers everyone's lives to save some guy she met only hours ago. It's a hollow character that only drags the story down. 
In an interview Rian Johnson said he wrote her as a character who doesn't belong in Star Wars. What are we supposed to take from that? That Asians have no place Star Wars? No wonder China pulled the movie from theaters almost immediately.

The new Star Wars try to put all these politics in the movie, in an obvious effort to change the mindset of people. But because they give us badly written characters and stereotypes, it fails miserably at doing so. I don't want to judge everything by race and gender, but because they focus so much on these issues, I'm forced to start thinking like that. Star Wars used to be on the frontline of these discussions, not by focussing on them, but by delivering a great story. And that's where Disney is taking this into the wrong direction.

Article by: Joel "Mith" Storms